Now Creative Group November 17, 2017 No Comments

Millenials better at saving than their parents?

Labelled as the “lazy and entitled” generation, Millenials have seen their share of criticism. But revel in this – a recent study shows that millennials are better at saving than their parents, the baby boomers.

According to bankrate.com, 60 percent of 18 to 26-year-olds are planning ahead compared to just 25 percent of the older generation. Another study, conducted by Nerd Wallet, shows that millennial parents are putting away 10% of their annual income, compared to Gen X saving 8% and Boomers saving 5%. NerdWallet also found that only 7% of millennials surveyed were not saving for retirement. These numbers are most likely linked to the fact that Millenials had a front-row seat to the 2007 financial crisis. If millennials continue to save at this rate, Nerd Wallet say’s the will outsave previous generations

Regardless of the fact that Millenials are paying more bills than their parents, and facing a much higher cost of living, they still lead when it comes to savings and retirement plans. Given that most millennials have between 20 to 40 years before they retire – there is plenty of time for that money to grow. This is a very smart financial decision on their part.

 

 

Now Creative Group November 14, 2017 No Comments

The Market Rebound Begins

In a promising sign that the traditionally positive seasonal effects of Fall on the real estate market are once again kicking in, October sales of homes in Toronto rose over 12% from September figures. The increase will be well received by realtors and prospective sellers, as it shows that the market is showing renewed resilience and that demand and buying potential remains firm. Growth in October is usually expected by teal estate professionals in a usual year, but the 12% increase is slightly stronger than usual metrics.

Prices for average homes also increase slightly, hitting roughly $780,000.00. Prices have been increasing for very conservative but the October increase shows an acceleration from September numbers – again, this is a very promising sign. The increase in prices and sales shows that a market that had faced rapid and dramatic cooling from a long list of government and regulatory measures after peaking in May is once again begin the slow but steady process of warming up again.

While sales and prices are slowly returning to health, concerns about a continued large gap in the supply of homes versus still shy demand remain with close market watchers and realtors. The gap may be bad for those wanting to sell, but benefits buyers, who at the height of the market in May were hard pressed to get a bid in a prospective home, let alone a fair shot of sealing the deal with a buy. The large amount of supply continues to place downward pressure on sales and price growth.

Condo market surge continues

As a previous Tembo blog has outlined, the condominium market in Toronto remains very strong and shows strong price and demand growth. Although many pockets of the GTA have lukewarm and slow condo markets, the overall market, and particularly activity in the core continues to surge. Average October prices increased over 20% in October. The average price of a condo in Toronto now exceeds $520,000.00

As Tembo has repeatedly stated, the fundamental underlying pillars of the GTA real estate market remain firm and strong, and in the long term, the market will continue to be resilient and will continue to offer opportunities for buyers and sellers.

Now Creative Group November 13, 2017 No Comments

The Rebound We’ve Been Waiting For

After having been walloped by a combination of new taxes, higher interest rates, tougher financing rules, and a massive glut of housing listings, the Toronto housing market showed positive signs of resilience and recovery by posting a 6% increase in re-sale home prices in August from September. Market watchers and realtors pointed to the increase as a good sign the market was finally pulling out of a period of price stagnation, low buyer interest, and dampened demand.

Many officials, market watchers, and financial and real estate professionals predicted the market would begin to recover and that prices would increase again in the beginning of fall. The news that this has been confirmed is yet another sign that the Toronto real estate market is in good shape and that it has strong underlying fundamentals. New listings numbers are also beginning to fall, meaning the supply of new homes is dropping, this is another positive trend for sellers who had a very tough summer selling season.

The price increase brought the average September price to $775,546.00, $20,000.00 more than the same price last year. The rebound mirrors long term trends in Vancouver, where a foreign buyer tax gutted demand and prices for almost a year, only to see prices and demand rebound and exceed past levels later. Market watchers are now eager to see if the positive trend continues into the middle of the fall and whether interest rate hikes and tighter insurance rules from federal regulators further increase pressure on the fragile market.

Housing starts increasing in urban areas

The market is responding to strong economic growth and still reasonably low borrowing costs. Urban housing construction is on pace to reach its strongest level since 2007 with a 8% increasing in urban detached housing starts which exceeded 60,000.00 units in August-September.

Now Creative Group November 1, 2017 No Comments

Your smartphone is now your financial advisor? Applications that will set you on the path to financial success.

If you’re anything like us – you’re always glued to your smartphone device. With every application you can imagine, our smartphones have quickly become our navigational system, entertainment system – and our financial advisor? That’s right – there are a ton of very useful (and easy to use) apps out there that will not only help you track your money, but manage it as well. Here are a few of our favourites at Tembo Financial:

Mint

Mint is a free app compatible with both IOS and Androids and allows you to track your finances, let’s you know if you’re about to go over budget, as well as categorize the types of spending you do. We love this app specifically for the later feature. Four dollars a day on a cup of coffee doesn’t seem so bad – but trust us, it ads up quite a bit. Tracking where your money is going to specifically can help you make much smarter financial decisions.

LearnVests

Although this app is unfortunately only available on IOS – it has its major pros (sorry Android users). Similar to Mint, LearnVests helps you track your spending and budget. But what makes LearnVest Different is its focus on financial literacy. LearnVest’s roots are in financial literacy and education, so it offers plenty of reading material in both the app and website, based on topics you select as important to you. We think this is a great feature for anyone who is still new to the world of bills, rents and debt. Understand how to spend wisely, and save will greatly benefit you down the line.

Budget Boss

This super easy app is an amazing way to evaluate the effectiveness of your budget. Creating a budget is one thing, but is it smart? Budget Boss analyzes the budget you’ve created and makes recommendations and estimations based on those numbers. Thinking 5… Even 10 years down the line is a bit of a daunting task. Budget Boss helps you create the smartest budget for your financial future.

Although these are only three out of many financial applications available, we truly believe that investing a little time tracking your spending, and creating a budget that works for you, will set you on the path to financial success.

Now Creative Group October 31, 2017 No Comments

The Bank of Canada Holds its Ground

The Bank of Canada was generally expected to raise its benchmark interest rate from 1.00 to 1.25 this week, but decided to hold its rate at 1.00. The Bank cited strong economic growth and the desire to moderate its pace of rate increases so consumers and the economy can better adjust to more expensive money. The Bank’s decision was met with interest as many expected it to stick to its aggressive rate hike pace. Many, however, believed the bank would hold off as surveys and media coverage showed that consumers were weary about the speed of interest rate increases and were worried about their ability to service the increased costs.

The immediate market reaction saw the dollar fall 0.65 cents and the TSX drop 60 points. Investors reported their view that the interest rate holding would lower economic growth for next year. Market watchers will take mixed views. Those in the real estate sector will cheer, as new taxes and stress test rules recently implemented will inevitably serve as a disincentive for builders to construct new homes and for buyers who are already under tremendous scrutiny from banks and insurers, especially first-time buyers.

The decision to hold shows that the Bank is concerned about excessively pressuring the real estate sector, given the new stress test rules will add cooling effects to an already lukewarm market at best. The Bank is likely to keep a close eye on inflation, GDP figures, and job numbers in the coming weeks and months before deciding to raise rates again in the next quarter. Fundamentally, the international trend is focused on raising rates, increasing the cost of capital, cooling consumption, and adding space and breathing room for central banks to decrease rates in any future economic challenges.

Now Creative Group October 6, 2017 No Comments

Stress Tests May Squeeze Homebuyers

Home buyers could lose a quarter of their home buying power if federal officials get their way in establishing guidelines to prevent people from borrowing too much. Federal officials are proposing stress testing uninsured mortgages. Uninsured mortgages are ones with a 20% minimum down payment. The government is wary about the financial sustainability and serviceability of these mortgages if interest rates rise.
If stress testing becomes a norm, it will reduce the ability of Canadians to borrow money and take on mortgage debt, and will place enormous pressures on an already pressured market to respond. Developers will see their pool of potential customers decreased, and demands for cheaper housing, which is already high, will continue to increase.
The federal agency responsible for stress tests in the financial system is the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions (OSFI), located in Toronto with offices around the country. OSFI’s mandate is to ensure that risk and contagion in the financial system is a low as possible. One particular area of concern has been the long-term reality of low-interest rates and their impact on mortgage insurance, banks, overall debt in the country, and the stability of the financial system.
While many recent changes to regulation, down payment standards for housing purchases, and interest rate increases have added stability and cooled what was an inflamed market, OSFI continues to work towards tougher and tighter standards in anticipation of future market risks. When recently questioned about the state of the housing market and the need for tougher measures, Federal Finance Minister Bill Morneau made the point that he felt enough had been done and that further action was not necessary for the time being.
With future interest rate rises on the horizon and the possibility of stress tests, it is clear that regulators are weary and vigilant about the potential risks to Canada’s housing market – a market that has become crucial to economic activity and the livelihoods of hundreds of thousands.

Now Creative Group October 2, 2017 No Comments

How Millennials Can Prepare for a Real Estate Investment

If you’re a millennial thinking of venturing into the real estate world, there’s a few things you need to learn about before taking your journey. You might be already drowning in student debt, and generating low income, however, knowing how to make your process easier will ultimately help you stress a little less and reach your goal a lot faster.

Think about long term property value

The first step you can take is to do your research and to find a location that matches affordability with long term equity (value) growth potential. Once you figure out where you would like to see yourself living, plan around it. Find out about the local community, restaurants, malls, gas stations, neighbours and school districts. Setting a goal for yourself will not only help you narrow down where you want to live, but make your agent’s job easier in finding what you’re looking for.

Increase your credit score

There is a good chance that your credit score may not be as good as you would hope for it to be due to student loans, job insecurity, or unstable financial circumstances. If you plan on making your purchase within the next few years, it would be a good idea to spend the time leading up to it building a good credit score. Money lending officers will scrutinize your credit score and decide whether giving you a loan would be a good fit for them. Spend some time planning your finances and learn to discipline your spending habits.

Save up

Saving up could be a challenge especially if you are a millennial with student loans. But being able to save can be a testament to your self-restraint and what you can accomplish when you set your mind to it. Taking out a percentage of each of your paychecks and stashing it away, paying off high-interest loans first, making bigger minimum payments, and spending the rest on necessities will help you save a lot quicker.

Know the market

Start out by knowing your budget and how much you’re willing to spend on your home. Match this budget to what your desired location of stay is and work around it. Learn about how long it takes the houses in that area to sell, how many times they’ve been sold, and if the price ever drastically changed. Knowing all this information will validate which home will be the best investment.

Now Creative Group September 26, 2017 No Comments

News from Washington and Ontario Real Estate

The Federal Reserve is the Central Bank of the United States. Like the Bank of Canada, the Federal Reserve, known as the Fed, manages the U.S. dollar by determining interest rates, and controlling the money supply (regulating the amount of money printed or injected into the system). The Fed also has significant regulatory powers – having a great deal of power in inspecting and administering American commercial and investment banks. It plays a significant role in determining capital reserve requirements (how much money banks keep on hand), and keeps an eye on banks to ensure their activities do not harm the U.S. and international financial system; largely to prevent a repeat of the 2007-8 crisis.

The Fed is the most powerful central bank on the planet by far, and plays a massive role in influencing the global economy and broad economic and financial trends. For the last decade, it led the way and began the international trend of lowering interest rates, printing money to inject liquidity into the international financial system, and loaned commercial and other Central banks trillions of dollars to keep them stable, functioning, and healthy. This Wednesday, Federal Reserve Chairwoman Janet Yellen announced that the Fed would no longer continue its policy of quantitative easing (money printing and asset buying) to support the credit and financial markets. It also sent strong signals that its decade long policy of low interest rates, easy money, and loose credit is fully and totally ending.

The Fed will likely raise rates one more time before the end of the year. The effects of these announcements are very important for Canada and the southern Ontario real estate market. The Bank of Canada almost always mimics the Fed’s actions and follows in its footsteps, as do other Central Banks because of the weight of the U.S. dollar and the size of the U.S. economy. The Bank of Canada has already bucked the Fed and is raising rates faster than the Fed. But the announcement that the Fed will no longer continue its loose policies will only encourage and reinforce the emerging trend by Bank of Canada (BOC) Governor Stephen Poloz in making money more expensive and in increasing interest rates.

A recent report by the Bank of International Settlements in Switzerland (BIS), the “central bank of central banks”, indicates that some members of the BIS believe that higher interest rates will now become the new norm and that the firm orthodoxy of easy money is now truly and completely, a thing of the past. The great international financial institutions of the world are moving to make money more expensive, and in the long term this will mean higher and higher mortgage rates, and less flexibility for our already Conservative banks to approve new mortgages.

Now Creative Group September 18, 2017 No Comments

After the Rate Hikes

The Government of Canada is carefully examining the effects of two rapid Bank of Canada rate hikes on the economy, the real estate market, and consumers. The immediate impact of the hikes saw prime mortgage rates increase across the entire spectrum in Canada, with variable rate mortgage holders affected the most. The rate hikes will likely slow down economic momentum, cool the housing market, and encourage consumers to keep on eye on their borrowing and spending habits – which were the intentions of the rapid hikes to begin with.

The economic data to be released in the next few weeks will likely influence the Bank’s decision on rates in October. There is a strong expectation that the Bank will likely increase rates again, as its position has become very hawkish. If the economic and real estate data is exceedingly poor and falls flat of baseline expectations, the Bank is likely to send warmer signals to the market that it will take its time on rates and raise them in a more gradual way over the medium to long term.

Governments around the world are very sensitive to interest rates. Increases that are too fast and too significant can significantly dampen economic growth and can spawn considerable resentment and unpopularity amongst voters. One of the key indicators of a government losing an election is the trajectory of interest in the run up stages. Federal Finance Minister Bill Morneau did not appear to voice his intention or opinion to act further on cooling the housing market. Interest rates in Canada are set by the Bank of Canada, which is fully independent of the government and which has complete and total purview over monetary policy.

Now Creative Group September 13, 2017 No Comments

Bank of Canada tightening tough on Markets

The Bank of Canada’s (BOC) decision to raise interest rates by a quarter basis point again last week came as a surprise to many and solidified the reality that the Bank has taken an aggressively hawkish position on the cost of money. The BOC had already reversed a historically unprecedented 7-year policy of record low interest rates on July 12th by topping the rate up to 0.75%. The second-rate rise in less than 2 months sent the value of Canadian dollar up but also had a direct impact on increasing mortgage costs and making business and commercial lending more onerous on borrowers as well. 

Canada’s big five banks immediately responded to the hike by announcing that their own respective mortgage rates would increase as well. The increase will have a powerful impact on the national housing market. In some regions where recent changes already had a significant cooling effect, the increase will only further make borrowing costs higher, particularly for first time buyers trying to enter the market. The move will also dissuade better prepared buyers who already have equity in the market from buying more or better-quality housing as equity growth and buying demand cools due to loss of market dynamism.

30% of Canadian homeowners who have variable rate mortgages will now have to adjust their household spending to make ends meet. While the rate rises may seem insignificant, the pace of the rate increases means that incrementally more expensive borrowing costs will accumulate and add up. This month’s increase also suggests that the Bank will likely increase rates again in October, as this matches the now emerging pattern of accelerating rates and lines up with the BOC’s increasingly hawkish and tightening rhetoric, and market expectations.

Why?

Many are scratching their heads as to why the BOC is raising rates so quickly. Inflation is very low at 1.2%. The BOC is known and respected throughout the world as one of the most successful inflation targeting Central Banks. This reputation was earned in the late 80s and early 90s as the Bank increased and maintained very high interest rates to break the back of double digit inflation caused by the 80s stock market and credit growth booms. The effect of these rapid rate rises on real estate, borrowing costs for consumers and businesses and consumer spending will be adverse. Tembo has several ideas.

First, the national economy is experiencing a big growth spurt and GDP growth rates increased by 4.5% in the second quarter. This was largely due to strong consumer spending, made affordable by a stable and healthy job market, some modest wage gains, and cheap borrowing costs. By raising rates, the BOC expects growth to cool to more sustainable medium to long term levels while sending signals to consumers to spend and borrow more Conservatively. There is also a broader international push by Central Banks to end the era of dirt cheap money, and the BOC, in the trendsetting style its admired for, is charging ahead.